An analysis of the roman empire under the rule of the caesars

The book about Galba is short. Galba was the first emperor of the Year of the Four Emperors. Suetonius describes Galba as being of noble birth, and born into a noble patrician family. Suetonius also includes a brief list of omens regarding Galba and his assassination.

An analysis of the roman empire under the rule of the caesars

The book about Galba is short. Galba was the first emperor of the Year of the Four Emperors. Galba was able to ascend to the throne because Nero's death meant the end of Julio-Claudian dynasty.

Suetonius includes a brief description of Galba's family history. Suetonius describes Galba as being of noble birth, and born into a noble patrician family.

Suetonius also includes a brief list of omens regarding Galba and his assassination. Most of this book describes Galba's ascension to the throne and his assassination, along with the usual side notes regarding his appearance and related omens.

Suetonius does not spend much time describing either any accomplishments nor any failures of his reign. According to Suetonius, Galba was killed by Otho's loyalists. About this time, Suetonius has exhausted all his imperial archival sources. Otho's reign was only a few months.

Therefore, the book on Otho is short, much as the book on Galba had been. Suetonius used a similar method to describe the life of Otho as he had used to describe the life of Galba. Suetonius describes Otho's family, and their history and nobility. And just as Suetonius had done with prior caesars, he includes a list of omens regarding Otho's reign and assassination.

Suetonius spends most of the book describing the ascension of Otho, his assassination, and the other usual topics.

The Roman Empire: in the First Century. The Roman Empire. Emperors. Julius Caeser | PBS

Suetonius suggests that as soon as Otho ascended the throne, he started defending himself against competing claims to the throne. According to Suetonius, Otho suffered a fate similar to the fate Galba had suffered.

It was the loyalists of another aspiring emperor in this case, the next emperor Vitellius who wanted to kill him.

Suetonius claims that one night Otho realized that he would soon be murdered. He contemplated suicide, but decided to sleep one more night before carrying out a suicide. That night he went to bed, with a dagger under his pillow. The next morning he woke up, and stabbed himself to death.

Bust of Vitellius In the book of the last of the short-lived emperors, Suetonius briefly describes the reign of Vitellius. Suetonius says that Otho killed himself while Vitellius was marching to Rome.

This book gives an unfavorable picture of Vitellius; however it should be remembered that Suetonius' father was an army officer who had fought for Otho and against Vitellius at the first Battle of Bedriacumand that Vespasian basically controlled history when he ascended to the throne.

Anything written about Vitellius during the Flavian dynasty would have to paint him in a bad light. Suetonius includes a brief description of the family history of Vitellius, and related omens.

Suetonius finally describes the assassination of Vitellius. According to Suetonius, Vitellius was dragged naked by Roman subjects, tied to a post, and had animal waste thrown at him before he was killed.

However, unlike the prior two emperors, it was not the next emperor who killed Vitellius. The next emperor and his followers had been waging a war against the Jews in Judaea at the time. The death of Vitellius and subsequent ascendance of his successor ended the worst year of the early principate.

Vespasian[ edit ] Suetonius begins by describing the humble antecedents of the founder of the Flavian dynasty and follows with a brief summary of his military and political career under Aulus PlautiusClaudius and Nero and his suppression of the uprising in Judaea. Suetonius documents an early reputation for honesty but also a tendency toward avariciousness.

A detailed recounting of the omens and consultations with oracles follows which Suetonius suggests furthered Vespasian 's imperial pretensions.

Suetonius then briefly recounts the escalating military support for Vespasian and even more briefly the events in Italy and Egypt that culminated in his accession. Suetonius presents Vespasian's early imperial actions, the reimposition of discipline on Rome and her provinces and the rebuilding and repair of Roman infrastructure damaged in the civil war, in a favourable light, describing him as 'modest and lenient' and drawing clear parallels with Augustus.

Vespasian is further presented as being extraordinarily just and with a preference for clemency over revenge. Suetonius describes avarice as Vespasian's only serious failing, documenting his tendency for inventive taxation and extortion.

Augustus: Birth and Inheritance

However, he mitigates this failing by suggesting that the emptiness of state coffers left Vespasian little choice. Moreover, intermixed with accounts of greed and 'stinginess' are accounts of generosity and lavish rewards.An Analysis of the Roman Empire Under the Rule of the Caesars PAGES 4.

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An analysis of the roman empire under the rule of the caesars

How did the Roman empire expand under Augustus? -Augustus added more territory to the empire than any other roman: He added much territory north of the Alps and in the Balkans. -He adopted the principal of client kingdom in the East which allowed him to use his military forces elsewhere. An Analysis of the Roman Empire Under the Rule of the Caesars PAGES 4.

WORDS 3, View Full Essay. More essays like this: the roman empire, pompey, the first triumvirate, rule pf the caesars. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University.

Exactly what I needed.

The Twelve Caesars - Wikipedia

the roman empire, pompey, . The Roman emperors were rulers of the Roman Empire, wielding power over its citizens and military, dating from the granting of the title of Augustus to Gaius Caesar Octavianus by the Roman .

Rome Under Julius Caesar's Rule Before Julius Caesar took power, the old monarchs of Rome deteriorated and a new government was formed.

The new government split the Romans into two groups, the Patricians and the Plebeians. Diocletian also restructured the Roman government by establishing the Tetrarchy, a system of rule in which four men shared rule over the massive Roman Empire. The empire was effectively divided in two, with an Augustus and a subordinate Caesar in each half.

The Roman Empire: in the First Century. The Roman Empire. Emperors. Julius Caeser | PBS